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What's the meaning of this article? I mean, the two people from the article say they have been living something like their whole life in the UK and now they haven't granted them the settled status. Why on earth they have been in the UK for so long and they didn't get a UK citizenship in the firstplace, though? This article is quite dodgy...

uk.reuters.com/article/uk-brit

@mauro as an EU citizen who's been in the UK since 2006 and hasn't become a UK citizen:

- because UK citizenship at this point costs north of £2000 in fees
- because many states require giving up the original citizenship (e.g. Germany only allows dual citizenship with other EU states and even that only since 2008)
- because UK citizenship applications require a lot of documentation they might not have to hand (e.g. proof of any trips abroad in the past five years to demonstrate residence)

@mauro and frankly, given EU freedom of movement basically negates the need for it, many of us very simply haven't bothered. the only significant difference for us would be gaining the right to vote in general elections here rather than in our country of citizenship.

@mauro also, with the UK Home Office's culture of "reject by default" for the past decade, a lot of people are anxious about attracting their attention in the first place for fear of being told for bullshit reasons they no longer have a right to remain and are to leave the country

and given that that has actually happened to EU citizens because of wrong guidance given to Home Office case workers by the government, that anxiety is entirely justified

@theoutrider can you explain this concept of "rejected by default" please?

@mauro the Home Office have a well-documented culture of trying to find any reason to reject asylum/visa/immigration claims ever since Theresa May became home secretary in... 2011? >>

@mauro For example, a number of EU citizens were refused permanent residence and told they no longer have leave to remain in the UK because they stopped working to e.g. take care of children or partners or in-laws full time and didn't get private health insurance

which *is* a requirement for non-EU citizens, but under EU freedom of movement EU citizens don't have to do this - yet the HO applied the non-EU guidance to EU citizens' applications

@mauro (also, funny enough, "permanent residence" is an EU procedure, with documents issued under EU law which will be invalid the day after Brexit) >>

@mauro similarly, just last year there was the "Windrush Scandal":

citizens of (now-former) UK colonies especially in the Caribbean who were invited into the country by the UK Government after World War II to help rebuild the country, with promises of rights equivalent to citizenship and a right to permanent residence

many of them brought young children which are now 50+ years old and have never been to their country of birth since they came here

@mauro and as the Home Office has become increasingly keen on pushing foreigners out, these people suddenly found letters saying they have to prove permanent residence with documentation required for *every single year they claim to have lived in the UK*, or face deportation to their country of nationality

Do you have any of your tax paperwork or utility bills from 20+ years ago? 30? 50? because I sure as hell don't

@mauro in fact, hundreds of these people *were* deported to countries they've never known, the government has admitted this was wrong, was court ordered to return these people and pay them compensation for their treatment

the compensation scheme still hasn't really paid out to anyone, many of the people wrongly deported haven't been contactable, some of them have just flat out died in a strange country and separated from their families

ukpol, brexit 

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